Amazing Egypt Holiday 15 Days 14 Nights

Amazing Egypt Holiday 15 Days 14 Nights

Amazing Egypt Holiday 15 Days 14 Nights
1 Day(s)

Tour Duration: 15 Days 14 Nights

Tour Type: Group Guided Tour

Tour Starts in: Cairo Saturday

Group Size: Maximum 15 persons

Tour Package Highlights:

Cities

Nights

Attractions

Cairo

4

Pyramids, Sphinx, Sakkara, Egyptian Museum, Citadel &  Khan El Khalili Bazaars
Alexandria

Montazah Summer Palace, Roman theater at Kom El Dikka, Bombay’s Pillar and Catacomb of Komel-Shokafa
Sleeper Train

1

Overnight sleeper Train from Cairo to Aswan
Aswan

2

Philae Temple and the High Dam

Felucca

1

Enjoy a day and a night adventure trip on boat of Nile Felucca traditional sailing boat

Kom Ombo

Kom Ombo Temple
Edfu

Horus Temple
Luxor

2

Valley of the Kings, Hatshepsut Temple, Colossi of Memnon, Karnak Temples and Luxor Temple
Hurghada

4

Enjoy relaxing on beaches, swimming, snorkeling in Hurghada

Itinerary

Day 01: Welcome to Cairo

Arrive Cairo Airport meet and assist by our representative

Transfer to your Hotel and check in

Free Day in Cairo,

Brief Meeting; will inform the time upon arrival   

Overnight in Cairo

  • Included Activities: Brief Meeting
  • Included Meals: No included Meals
  • Optional Activities: In the evening opportunity to do Optional Excursion (Sound and Light Show at Pyramids) and that is according to your flight arrival details 

Day 02: Pyramids, Sphinx And Sakkara

Breakfast; your tour guide of the day will pick up you to start your day tour to Sakkara – an ancient necropolis with many half-buried tombs and the famous Zhoser’s step pyramid

Lunch in local Restaurant

 Then driving to visit Egypt’s most loved sight – The Great Pyramids of Giza, We explore the Giza plateau, pyramids and massive lion-headed Sphinx.

At the end of the day we will transfer you back to your hotel in Cairo.

Dinner in local restaurant or at hotel

Overnight in Cairo

  • Included Activities; Sightseeing Pyramids, Sphinx And Sakkara
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: In the evening opportunity to do (Dinner Nile Cruise and Belly Dancing Show in Cairo)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 03: Montazah Summer Palace, Roman theater at Kom El Dikka, Bombay’s Pillar and Catacomb of Komel-Shokafa

After breakfast in your hotel in Cairo your guide for the day will pick you up and transfer you cutting across 220 Kilometers of the Western desert from Cairo to the city of Alexandria, the bride of the Mediterranean Sea. The trip takes about 3 hours.

Upon arrival, your  leader will take you to visit the Montazah Summer Palace, walk around and enjoy the Montazah gardens. Originally built in 1892, it was the summer home of the Egyptian Royal family. Lunch is taken in-route at a popular seafood district.

Lunch in local Restaurant

Following lunch you will visit the Roman theater at Kom El Dikka, which is thought to have been a place more for public meetings than for performances. The excellent condition of these ruins is attributed to their accidental discovery 20 years ago during a construction project in downtown Alexandria.

Next is a visit to the Bombay’s Pillar which was built in 297 AD for the Roman Emperor Diocletian. The Pillar itself is a 9 meters / 29 feet in circumference and it is said that 22 people could lunch on the capital, or flat top of the Pillar. 

The day ends with a visit to the Catacomb of Komel-Shokafa. These tombs were tunneled into the bedrock in the age of the Antonine emperors (2nd century A.D.) for a single wealthy family still practicing the ancient religion. These tombs represent the last existing major construction for the sake of the old Egyptian religion.

At the end of the day you will return back to your hotel in Cairo

Dinner and overnight in Cairo

  • Included Activities: Sightseeing Montazah Summer Palace, Roman theater at Kom El Dikka, Bombay’s Pillar and Catacomb of Komel-Shokafa
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: No

Day 04: Egyptian Museum, Citadel, Khan El Khalili Bazaars and overnight sleeper train to Aswan

Breakfast; check out from hotel Today your guide for the day will pick you up from the hotel and start your visits to the Egyptian Museum of antiquities, which was established in 1902 near the city center in Cairo, On display is a rare collection of 5000 years of art — the largest most precious collection of Egyptian art in the world. Over 250,000 genuine artifacts are presented, including an exhibit dedicated to the Tutankhamen collection of treasures, gold, and jewelry, as it was enclosed in his tomb for over 3,500 years before it was discovered in the 1920’s when his tomb was excavated

Lunch in Local Restaurant

Next on the itinerary is the renown Citadel that was built by Saladin in the 12th Century and was the seat of power for the following 700 years. On the premises is the Alabaster Mosque of Mohammed Ali, one of the landmarks in Cairo whose minaret can be seen from any part of the city. The Mohammed Ali mosque was built in Turkish style, very similar to the Blue Mosque in Turkey

In the afternoon we will visit the Khan El Khalili Bazaars that dates back to 1382. Shops in this district are legendary for fine brassware, copper, perfumes, leather, silver, gold, antiques and more! Everything for sale in these shops is negotiable, be prepared to bargain for goods sold in this exciting maze of shops!

At the end of the day we will transfer you to Giza Railway Station to take your overnight sleeper train to Aswan

Dinner on board of the sleeper train

  • Included Activities: the Egyptian Museum, the Citadel and Khan El Khalili Bazaars
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: No

Day 05: Welcome to Aswan; Philae Temple and the High Dam

Breakfast on board of the sleeper train

Upon arrival at Aswan Railway station our representative in Aswan will pick up you and transfer to your hotel in Aswan

Check in at your hotel and free morning in Aswan

Lunch in Local restaurant

At 01.00 PM Proceed with the visits of Aswan including the Temple of Philae. The Philae Temple or the Temple of Isis in Egypt, The word Philae (depending on whether you consider Greek or Egyptian meanings) usually carries the connotation of a remote place, or the end angle of an island. The ancient Egyptians called the island P-aaleq, which carried a dual meaning of the words “end” and “creation.”

When you read about the Philae Temple you are studying about the main temple complex that was relocated from the island of Philae to the island of Agilika, following the creation of the High Dam. The actual island of Philae doesn’t exist anymore, as it is now somewhere beneath the Lake Nasser.

The Significance Of The Temple

What is the significance of the PhilaeTemple in Egypt? It is believed to be the former center point of worship to the goddess Isis that saw use during the Ptolemaic period of Ancient Egypt. Historians speculate that given all the different structures once found on PhilaeIsland, the total time of construction may have taken 800 years.

The island of Philae was home to both priests as well as workingmen, which included stonemasons and carpenters that were helping with these elaborate construction projects their entire lives.

The Relocation Project

What happened to the PhilaeTemple and why does the island of Philae not exist anymore? In 1902 the Aswan Low Dam was completed on the NileRiver, courtesy of British developers. Unfortunately, this massive project threatened many ancient landmarks, including the temple complex of Philae. The real island of Philae was constantly being flooded, even when the dam was heightened on two instances, first from 1907 to 1912 and then 1929 to 1934. Eventually it was decided that the temples of Philae should be relocated in order to preserve their history.

Therefore, the relocation project began after 1960 when UNESCO formulated a plan to move each structure, piece by piece. The pieces were reassembled at Agilkai a little over 500 meters away and the site continues to stand to this day. The physical part of the relocation lasted from 1977 to 1980.
Obviously, the natural beauty of the temples enhanced by live vegetation and vivid color has been “washed away” through time. However, the temple structures remain intact and are surprisingly accurate compared to the original layout. This is because every block of the temple was labeled and its positions carefully noted so that it could be replicated, not merely duplicated.
The relocation project is so detailed that even the elevated land of the original temple has been recreated through landscaping. You most likely couldn’t tell the difference – provided you were born in the 1800s and had the luxury of comparison.
The Philae Temple is not only a landmark of architecture but also an incredible story of construction and reconstruction.

Then to the High Dam

The British began construction of the first dam in 1899. Construction lasted until 1902.It was opened in December 10 1902. The project was designed by Sir William Willcocks and involved several eminent engineers including Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Aird, whose firm, John Aird & Company, was the main contractor. A gravity dam, it was 1,900 m long and 54 m high. The initial design was soon found to be inadequate and the height of the dam was raised in two phases, 1907-1912 and 1929-1933.

When the dam almost overflowed in 1946 it was decided that rather than raise the dam a third time, a second dam would be built 6 km upriver (about 4 miles). Proper planning began in 1952, just after the Nasser revolution, and at first the USA and Britain were to help finance construction with a loan of USD $270 million. Both nations cancelled the offer in July 1956 for reasons not entirely known. A secret Egyptian arms agreement with Czechoslovakia (Eastern Bloc) and Egyptian recognition of the People’s Republic of China are cited as possible reasons. Soon thereafter, Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal, intending to use its tolls to subsidize the High Dam project. This prompted Britain, France, and Israel to attack Egypt, occupying the Suez Canal and precipitating the Suez Crisis. The United Nations, USSR and US forced the invaders to withdraw and the canal was left in Egyptian hands. The Egyptian government continued to intend to finance the dam project alone by using the revenues of the Suez Canal to help pay for construction. But as part of the Cold War struggle for influence in Africa the Soviet Union stepped in in 1958, and possibly a third of the cost of the dam was paid for as a gift. The Soviets also provided technicians and heavy machinery. The enormous rock and clay dam was designed by the Russian Zuk Hydroproject Institute.

Construction began in 1960. The High Dam, as-Sad al-‘Aali, was completed on July 21, 1970, with the first stage finished in 1964. The reservoir began filling in 1964 while the dam was still under construction and first reached capacity in 1976. The reservoir raised concerns from archaeologists and a rescue operation was begun in 1960 under UNESCO. Sites were surveyed and excavated and 24 major monuments were moved to safer locations (see Abu Simbel) or granted to countries that helped with the works (such as the Debod temple in Madrid and the Temple of Dendur in New York).

The Aswan High Dam is 3,600 m in length, 980 m wide at the base, 40 m wide at the crest and 111 m tall. It contains 43 million of material. At maximum, 11,000 m of water can pass through the dam every second. There are further emergency spillways for an extra 5000 per second and the Toshka Canal links the reservoir to the Toshka Depression. The reservoir, named Lake Nasser, is 550 km long and 35 km at it’s widest with a surface area of 5,250 km and holds 132 km.

The dam powers twelve generators each rated at 175 megawatts, producing a hydroelectric output of 2.1 gigawatts. Power generation began in 1967. When the dam first reached peak output it produced around half of Egypt’s entire electricity production (about 15% by 1998) and allowed for the connection of most Egyptian villages to electricity for the first time. The dam mitigated the effects of dangerous floods in 1964 and 1973 and of threatening droughts in 1972-73 and 1983-84. A new fishing industry has been created around Lake Nasser, though it is struggling due to its distance from any significant markets.

and the last stop at the Perfume Store

Back to hotel

Dinner in local restaurant or at hotel

Overnight in Aswan

  • Included Activities: the Philae Temple, the High Dam and Perfume Store
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Optional Activities: In the evening opportunity to do (Sound and Light Show at Philae Temple)

Day 06: Free Day in Aswan ( Abu Simbel Temples and Nubian Village Optional Excursions)

Breakfast at hotel

Free day to explore Aswan or you can take the following optional Excursions

Lunch in local restaurant

Dinner in local restaurant or at hotel

  • Included Activities: No
  • Included Meals: Breakfast – Lunch – Dinner
  • Optional Activities: Early morning there is opportunity to do Optional Excursion to Abu Simbel Temples (if you take this option you will have breakfast box as will start around 04.00AM)

The Abu Simbel temples are two massive rock temples in Abu Simbel (أبو سمبل in Arabic) in Nubia, southern Egypt. They are situated on the western bank of Lake Nasser, about 230 km southwest of Aswan (about 300 km by road). The complex is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the “Nubian Monuments,”[1] which run from Abu Simbel downriver to Philae (near Aswan).

The twin temples were originally carved out of the mountainside during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II in the 13th century BC, as a lasting monument to himself and his queen Nefertari, to commemorate his alleged victory at the Battle of Kadesh, and to intimidate his Nubian neighbors. However, the complex was relocated in its entirety in 1968, on an artificial hill made from a domed structure, high above the Aswan High Dam reservoir.

The relocation of the temples was necessary to avoid their being submerged during the creation of Lake Nasser, the massive artificial water reservoir formed after the building of the Aswan High Dam on the Nile River. Abu Simbel remains one of Egypt’s top tourist attractions.

Construction of the temple complex started in approximately 1264 B.C. and lasted for about 20 years, until 1244 B.C. Known as the “Temple of Ramesses, beloved by Amun,” it was one of six rock temples erected in Nubia during the long reign of Ramesses II. Their purpose was to impress Egypt’s southern neighbors, and also to reinforce the status of Egyptian religion in the region. Historians say that the design of Abu Simbel expresses a measure of ego and pride in Ramesses II.

The Great Temple at Abu Simbel, which took about twenty years to build, was completed around year 24 of the reign of Ramesses the Great (which corresponds to 1265 BCE). It was dedicated to the gods Amun, Ra-Horakhty, and Ptah, as well as to the deified Rameses himself.[5] It is generally considered the grandest and most beautiful of the temples commissioned during the reign of Rameses II, and one of the most beautiful in Egypt.

Four colossal 20 meter statues of the pharaoh with the double Atef crown of Upper and Lower Egypt decorate the facade of the temple, which is 35 meters wide and is topped by a frieze with 22 baboons, worshippers of the sun and flank the entrance.[6] The colossal statues were sculptured directly from the rock in which the temple was located before it was moved. All statues represent Ramesses II, seated on a throne and wearing the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt. The statue to the left of the entrance was damaged in an earthquake, leaving only the lower part of the statue still intact. The head and torso can still be seen at the statue’s feet.

Next to the legs of the colossi, there are other statues no higher than the knees of the pharaoh.[5] These depict Nefertari, Ramesses’s chief wife, and queen mother Mut-Tuy, his first two sons Amun-her-khepeshef, Ramesses, and his first six daughters Bintanath, Baketmut, Nefertari, Meritamen, Nebettawy and Isetnofret.

The entrance itself is crowned by a bas-relief representing two images of the king worshiping the falcon-headed Ra Harakhti, whose statue stands in a large niche.[5] This god is holding the hieroglyph “user” and a feather in his right hand, with Ma’at, (the goddess of truth and justice) in his left; this is nothing less than a gigantic cryptogram for Ramesses II’s throne name, User-Maat-Re. The facade is topped by a row of 22 baboons, their arms raised in the air, supposedly worshipping the rising sun. Another notable feature of the facade is a stele which records the marriage of Ramesses with a daughter of king Hattusili III, which sealed the peace between Egypt and the Hittites.

The inner part of the temple has the same triangular layout that most ancient Egyptian temples follow, with rooms decreasing in size from the entrance to the sanctuary. The temple is complex in structure and quite unusual because of its many side chambers. The hypostyle hall (sometimes also called a pronaos) is 18 meters long and 16.7 meters wide and is supported by eight huge Osirid pillars depicting the deified Ramses linked to the god Osiris, the god of the Underworld, to indicate the everlasting nature of the pharaoh. The colossal statues along the left-hand wall bear the white crown of Upper Egypt, while those on the opposite side are wearing the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt(pschent). The bas-reliefs on the walls of the pronaos depict battle scenes in the military campaigns the ruler waged. Much of the sculpture is given to the Battle of Kadesh, on the Orontes River in present-day Syria, in which the Egyptian king fought against the Hittites.The most famous relief shows the king on his chariot shooting arrows against his fleeing enemies, who are being taken prisoner. Other scenes show Egyptian victories in Libya and Nubia.

From the hypostyle hall, one enters the second pillared hall, which has four pillars decorated with beautiful scenes of offerings to the gods. There are depictions of Ramesses and Nefertari with the sacred boats of Amun and Ra-Harakhti. This hall gives access to a transverse vestibule in the middle of which is the entrance to the sanctuary. Here, on a black wall, are rock cut sculptures of four seated figures: Ra-Horakhty, the deified king Ramesses, and the gods Amun Ra and Ptah. Ra-Horakhty, Amun Ra and Ptah were the main divinities in that period and their cult centers were at Heliopolis, Thebes and Memphis respectively.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opportunity to do Optional Excursion (Nubian Village)

The Nubian Village there you going to discover the simple and natural life of the very kind and hospitable Nubian people.    


 

 

 

 

Day 07: Enjoy a day sailing in the Nile by Felucca traditional adventure sailing boat

Breakfast at Hotel, Check out from hotel

09.00 AM our representative will pick up you from your hotel in Aswan and transfer to Nile Felucca traditional adventure sailing boat to start enjoying a day sailing by felucca traditional adventure sailing boat to north direction

Lunch on board of the Nile Felucca

Enjoy sailing on the Nile

Afternoon Tea time

You will enjoy taking some pictures during the Sunset

Here are Some Information About The Nile Felucca adventure traditional Sailing Boat

Feluccas are the traditional sailboats of Egypt Nile. Egyptians and foreigners alike enjoy a relaxing Felucca ride, as they are perfect for catching the breeze on a hot summer night, for brisker sails the rest of the year and watching the sunset anytime. They are ideal for an impromptu party after work, a romantic evening, and for soothing the tots on the weekends. It is not unusual for friends to get together and rent a felucca for an hour or two for a small social gathering. Such gatherings, frequently after sunset, may not do much sailing at all, but simply sit in a quiet cove where everyone can enjoy the lights on the banks and the river traffic.

The felucca has remained, over the centuries, the primary transportation of the Nile. Its ancient form still graces the river as it has done since the time of the Pharaohs. Motorized barges transport bulk material and modern cruise ships transport tourists, but the felucca remains despite modern alternatives. The felucca rarely has any form of engine and relies entirely on the breeze which builds during the day and usually subsides at night, and the Nile River’s current. Egypt is blessed with a predominant southerly wind that pushes sailboats upriver, while allowing them to return on its current downstream.

Some of the craft today are used to carry tourists who wish to enjoy an eternally peaceful journey carried along by the gentle breeze and the currents of the river. In fact, a felucca ride is very often included in many standard tours. Some feluccas even carry passengers for longer voyages of several days, but only the most adventurous tourists usually take part in these, as the accommodations are rather primitive.

Few feluccas are now made entirely of wood, but the basic layout has barely changed. They don’t have a keel as such, but a heavy center plate which can be raised in the shallows. The sails are seriously low tech affairs made of native cotton and other natural fibers.

Feluccas are usually furnished with cushions around the circumference and a table fixed in the middle; where one can surely enjoy picnic style lunch or dinner while enjoying a different view of the metropolis. Your captain tucks his Galabeya (tradition Egyptian male dress) about his waist and steers with his feet, while busily drawing and letting the sail to and fro as the vessel tacks up and down the Nile.

This is the perfect short trip if you want to enjoy the best of Egypt in an adventurous and informal style. Beginning with the Great Pyramids and Sphinx in Cairo, we see all the classic sights of Egypt. There’s Luxor and the Temple of Karnak, the Valley of the Kings, the Colossi of Memnon, and a free day in Aswan to allow an optional visit to Abu Simbel. The adventure comes in our choice of Nile transport, where we have opted for the single-masted, lateen-rigged sailing boat called the felucca. These age-old workhorses of the Nile give us the freedom to cruise between the great sites along the river, watching rural life pass us by. The winds and currents may necessitate some adjustments to the itinerary, but the schedule is designed to allow for flexibility. Throughout the trip you will be accompanied by one of our local guides who are all experts on ancient Egypt.

Dinner on board of the Nile Felucca

Overnight on board of the Felucca traditional sailing boat

Here are some pictures show you how and where you will be sleeping on the Felucca adventure traditional sailing boat

  • Included Activities: Enjoy sailing by Felucca adventure traditional sailing boat
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch – Dinner
  • Optional Activities: No

Day 08: Kom Ombo Temple, Edfu Temple And Transfer To Luxor

Breakfast on board of the Nile Felucca traditional sailing boat

After breakfast you will be picked from the Nile Felucca traditional sailing boat by your Driver and Tour Guide of the day and start a short drive to Kom Ombo City where you will stop there to Visit the Temple of Kom-Ombo, dedicated for Gods Sobek and Haroeris

Kom Ombo Temple

Located in the town of Kom-Ombo, about 28 miles north of Aswan, the Temple, dating to the Ptolemy’s, is built on a high dune overlooking the Nile. The actual temple was started by Ptolemy VI Philometor in the early second century BC.  Ptolemy XIII built the outer and inner hypostyle halls. The outer enclosure wall and part of the court were built by Augustus sometime after 30 BC, and are mostly gone.  There are also tombs from the Old Kingdom in the vicinity of Kom-Ombo village.

The Temple known as Kom Ombo is actually two temples consisting of a Temple to Sobek and a Temple of Haroeris.  In ancient times, sacred crocodiles basked in the sun on the river bank near here. The Temple has scant remains, due first to the changing Nile, then the Copts who once used it as a church, and finally by builders who used the stones for new buildings.

Everything is duplicated along the main axis.  There are two entrances, two courts, two colonades, two hypostyle halls and two sanctuaries.  There were probably even two sets of priests. The left or northern side is dedicated to Haroeris (sometimes called Harer, Horus the Elder) who was the falcon headed sky god and the right to Sobek (the crocodile headed god).  The two gods are accompanied by their families.  They include Haroeris’ wife named Tesentnefert, meaning the good sister and his son, Panebtawy.  Sobeck likewise is accompanied by his consort, Hathor and son, Khonsu.

Foundations are all that are left of the original Pylon.  Beyond the Pylon, there was once a staircase in the court that leads to a roof terrace.  The court has a columned portico and central altar.  There is a scene of the King leaving his palace escorted by standards. Near the sanctuary is a purification scene.  On either side of the door to the pronaos are columns inscribed with icons of the lotus (south) and papyrus (north), symbolizing the ‘two lands’ of Egypt.

In the southwest corner of the pronaos is the one column that does not echo the duality of the temples.  Here, there are scenes depicting purification of the King, his coronation and his consecration of the Temple.  The ceiling has astronomical images.

The hypostyle hall has papyrus capitals on the columns.  Here, there is an inventory of the scared places of Egypt, the gods of the main towns and the local and national festivals.

In the anti-chamber, there are scenes depicting the goddess Seshat launching the building of the temple, followed by a scene of the completed temple with the king throwing natron in a purification ceremony.  The staircase leading to the roof is all that remains of the offering hall.

Statues to the gods and the builders of the temple once occupied the net room just before the sanctuaries.  The ceiling of the pure place to the north still remains with an image of Nut.  There is little left of the sanctuaries.

Drive from Kom Ombo City 60 KM to north direction for the second stop at Edfu City to visit Temple of Horus, dedicated to the God Horus

Hours Temple

It lies in Edfu town, 123 km north of Aswan on the west bank of the Nile. It dates back to the Ptolemaic period. It was dedicated to the worship of god Horus represented as a falcon. It is one of the most beautiful Egyptian temples, distinguished by its huge splendid structure that blends Pharaonic and Greek architecture.

Its grandeur competes with Luxor temples. It is the second largest temple after Karnak. It also houses the Nilometer and a huge pylon at the entrance. It was discovered in 1860 by the famous archaeologist Mariette. On its walls are reliefs which depict the history of Ptolemy’s and reflect religious belief and art style of the period.

Drive from Edfu City 120 KM to Luxor

Lunch in local Restaurant

Check in at your Hotel in Luxor

Free afternoon

Dinner in local restaurant

  • Included Activities: Temple of Kom Ombo, Temple of Horus in Edfu
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities:

Afternoon; Opportunity to do Optional Excursion City tour in Luxor by Horse carriage

Evening; Opportunity to do Optional Excursion (Sound & Lights Show at Karnak Temple)

Day 09: Valley of the Kings, Hatshepsut Temple, Colossi of Memnon, Karnak Temples and Luxor Temple

Breakfast at Hotel

In the morning cross the Nile to visits the West Bank of Luxor including the Valley of Kings, the factory of the Alabaster Stones then the Temple of Queen Hatshepsut at Deir El-Bahari and the two Statues of Colossi of Memnon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lunch in local restaurant

Back to your hotel for relaxing

03.00PM Pickup from your hotel and start your guided tour to visit the East Bank of the Nile including the Temple of Karnak & the Temple of Luxor then transfer to your hotel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dinner in local restaurant or at hotel

Overnight in Luxor

  • Included Activities: Valley of the Kings, the factory of the Alabaster Stones, Hatshepsut Temple, Colossi of Memnon, Karnak and Luxor Temples
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: Early morning there is opportunity to do Optional Excursion Hot Air Balloon over Luxor (if you take this option you will have breakfast box)

Day 10: Luxor to Hurghada

Breakfast at hotel

Check out from the hotel

Transfer from luxor to Hurghada around 4 hours driving

Check in at the Hotel in Hughada

Lunch at your Hotel

Free afternoon at leisure

Dinner at your hotel

Overnight in Hurghada

  • Included Activities: No
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: There is opportunity to do Optional Excursion to Dendera Temple then drive to Hurghada

Day 11: Hurghada

Breakfast at Hotel

Free day at Leisure, but with the magnificent Red Sea at your doorstep you may well want to go and discover the amazing colorful marine life. There is time to take an introductory dive or take an organized day trip to go snorkeling at Giftun Island with lunch included. You may just like to make the most of the sun loungers and have a day of swimming, sunbathing and relaxation on the beach.

Lunch at Hotel

Dinner at Hotel

Overnight in Hurghada

  • Included Activities: No
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: There is opportunity to do Optional Excursion (snorkeling at Giftun Island) 

 

Day 12: Hurghada 

Breakfast at Hotel

Free day at Leisure

Lunch at Hotel

Dinner at Hotel

Overnight in Hurghada

  • Included Activities: No
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: There is opportunity to do Optional Excursion (City Tour)

Day 13: Hurghada

Breakfast at Hotel

Free day at Leisure

Lunch at Hotel

Dinner at Hotel

Overnight in Hurghada

  • Included Activities: No
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Optional Activities: There is opportunity to do Optional Excursion (Desert Safari)

Day 14: Hurghada / Cairo

Breakfast, you have free day at Leisure

Check out from the Hotel

Lunch in local restaurant in Hurghada

Transfer from your hotel in Hughada by car or bus to Cairo around 6 hours driving

Dinner at local restaurant in Cairo

Check in at your Hotel in Cairo

Overnight at Cairo

  • Included Activities; No
  • Included Meals: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
  • Optional Activities: No

Day 15: End Of Our Services

Breakfast and check out from your hotel then transfer to Cairo Airport for the final departure. End of our services

  • Included Activities: No
  • Included Meals: Breakfast
  • Optional Activities: No

Prices are quoted in US Dollars per Person per Package.

Seasons and Rates Single Double Triple
Winter Season start from 01/10 To 30/04 $0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0
Summer Season start from 01/05 To 30/09 $0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0
Easter Season start from 24 /03 To 08 /04 $0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0
Christmas & New Year start from 18/12 To 07/01 $0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0
$0
€0
£0

What’s included in the Package Prices?

Accommodations:

Hotel in Cairo:

4 Nights at hotel in Cairo

Sleeper Train:

overnight sleeper Train from Cairo to Aswan

Hotel in Aswan:

2 Nights at hotel in Aswan

Felucca:

1 Night at Nile Felucca adventure traditional sailing boat

Hotel in Luxor:

2 Nights at hotel in Luxor

Hotel in Hurghada:

2 Nights at hotel in Hurghada

Meals:

Breakfasts

14 Breakfasts

Lunches

14 Lunches

Dinners

14 Dinners a

Beverages:

Free one small bottle of water in the bus in every excursion

Transfers And Sightseeings 
  • (Day 01) Arrival transfer from Cairo Airport to Hotel in Cairo
  • (Day 02) Tour to Pyramids, Sphinx and Sakkara by private bus and private Tour Guide for the group
  • (Day 03) Day Tour to Alexandria to Visit Montazah Summer Palace, Roman Theater, Kom El Dikka, Bombay’s Pillar and Catacomb of Komel-Shokafa by private bus and private Tour Guide for the group
  • (Day 04) Tour to the Egyptian Museum, Citadel and Khan El Khalili Bazaars by private bus and private Tour Guide for the group
  • (Day 04) Transfer to Giza Railway Station to take overnight sleeper train to Aswan
  • (Day 05) Arrival transfer from Aswan Railway Station to your Hotel in Aswan
  • (Day 05) Tour to Philae Temple and the High Dam by private bus and private Tour Guide for the group
  • (Day 07) Transfer from your hotel in Aswan to Nile Felucca Sailing boat
  • (Day 08) Transfer from Felucca boat to Luxor including two visits on the way to Kom Ombo Temple and Horus Temple with private bus and private Tour Guide for the group
  • (Day 09) Tour to Valley of the Kings, Hatshepsut Temple, Colossi of Memnon, Karnak Temple and Luxor Temple by private car and private Tour Guide for the group
  • (Day 10) Transfer from Luxor to Hurghada by private bus around 4 hours driving
  • (Day 14) Transfer from Hurghada to Cairo by private bus around 6 hours driving
  • (Day 15) Departure transfer from hotel in Cairo to Cairo Airport for final departure
  • Sightseeing’s Entrance Fees
  • All transfers by air-conditioned, non-smoking vehicle or buses
  • All service charges and taxes

Tour Guide:

  • Services of experienced Egyptologist English speaking Tour Guide joins you in the Sightseeing Excursions

What’s Excluded in the Package Prices?

  • International flights
  • Egypt VISAS
  • Travel Insurance
  • Entrance Fees to the inside of the Great Pyramid
  • Entrance Fees to The Mummies Room at the Egyptian Museum
  • Entrance Fees to Solar Boat – near the Pyramids USD 05 per person
  • Camel or Horse ride at pyramids
  • Entrance fees to Tutankhamun Tomb inside Valley of the Kings
  • Any extras not mentioned in the program
  • Optional Excursions
  • Personal expenses
  • Tipping as written in the following???
  • All Beverages even water except one small bottle of water in the bus in every excursion

Optional Excursions Prices If Need It Are Quoted Per Person in American Dollar ($)

  • Sound & Lights Show at Pyramids includes transfers – Entrance Fees 70 $ per person, in case of solo traveler 35 $ supplement will apply
  • Dinner Nile Cruise and Belly Dancing Show in Cairo 70 $ per person, in case of solo traveler 35 $ supplement will apply
  • Sound & Lights Show at Philae Temple includes transfers – Entrance Fees 70 $ per person, in case of solo traveler 35 $ supplement will apply
  • Abu Simbel by car includes transfers – Entrance Fees – Guide 160 $ per person, in case of solo traveler 90 $ supplement will apply
  • Nubian Village in Aswan 60 $ per person, in case of solo traveler 30 $ supplement will apply
  • City tour in Luxor by Horse carriage 35 $ per person, in case of solo traveler 10 $ supplement will apply
  • Hot Air Balloon over Luxor 150 $ per person
  • Sound & Lights Show at Karnak Temple includes transfers – Entrance Fees 70 $ per person, in case of solo traveler 35 $ supplement will apply
  • Snorkeling day trip around Island includes transfers – Lunch and Snorkeling equipment 80 $ per Person

Children Policy:

  • Children till 3 years old will be Free for Accommodation sharing parent room for a maximum one Child
  • Children between 3 / 11 years old will be charge with 50% of total Package price as an adult sharing parent room
  • Children over 11 years old will be charge as an adult person

What you need?

Camera – Hat – Sun block – Comfortable Footwear – Swimwear

What is the budget of this Tour?

Dear Clients Please know that the tour price covers the services stated in the “Inclusions” section only and there are many other personal expenses which will occur during your trip are not included in the Tour prices such as Optional Activities, Tipping etc

Gratuities And Tipping:

How much is the average Tipping and when to give it?

Hotel Crew:

On Average there are about 50 to 100 people working in the Hotel. The Guest sees only 5 or 7 persons of the crew. So it is unfair to give tips to people that you see and forget other people. That’s why there is a rule in all Hotels that Guest should not pay any tips for anyone during the stay. All Tips must be given at the end of your stay. You put your tips in an envelope and write the amount on the back then leave it at the Reception of your Hotel. All Tips will be collected from clients and divided to the whole Hotel Staff. This is a Fair solution for everyone.

Hotel in Cairo:

The Tips is about 3 $ Per Person per Night. For Example, if you are 2 Person and having a 4 Nights’ accommodation in the Hotel your Tip Amount will be:

3 $ x 4 Nights x 2 Person = 24 $.

  • So you Leave 24 $ in an Envelope at the Reception on the End of your stay at the Hotel in the checkout time.
  • For People who are carrying your bags in the check in and the check out from the hotel they will get alone tipping from you in the time of check out 1 $ per person. Those tipping are not including in the tipping which you left at the reception of the hotel

Sleeper Train:

The Tips is about 1 $ Per Person per Night. For Example, if you are 2 Person and having a 1 Night accommodation on the sleeper train from Cairo to Aswan your Tip Amount will be:

1 $ x 1 Night x 2 Person = 2 $.

  • So you give 2 $ to the person which responsible of the service of your sleeper train as he will service for you the dinner and the breakfast before departs from the train
  • For People who are carrying your bags from your bus to inside the Giza Railway Station they will get alone tipping from you 1 $ per person.
  • For People who are carrying your bags from inside Aswan Railway Station to your bus they will get alone tipping from you 1 $ per person

Hotel in Aswan:

The Tips is about 3 $ Per Person per Night. For Example, if you are 2 Person and having a 2 Nights’ accommodation in the Hotel your Tip Amount will be:

3 $ x 2 Nights x 2 Person = 12 $.

  • So you Leave 12 $ in an Envelope at the Reception on the End of your stay at the Hotel in the checkout time.
  • For People who are carrying your bags in the check in and the check out from the hotel they will get alone tipping from you in the time of check out 1 $ per person. Those tipping are not including in the tipping which you left at the reception of the hotel

Felucca:

The Tips is about 10 $ Per Person per Night. For Example, if you are 2 Person and having a night accommodation on board of the Nile Felucca sailing boat your Tip Amount will be:

10 $ x 1 Night x 2 Person = 20 $.

  • So you Leave 20 $ in an Envelope and give it to the Felucca Caption in the checkout time.

Hotel in Luxor:

The Tips is about 3 $ Per Person per Night. For Example, if you are 2 Person and having a 2 Nights’ accommodation in the Hotel your Tip Amount will be:

3 $ x 2 Nights x 2 Person = 12 $.

  • So you Leave 12 $ in an Envelope at the Reception on the End of your stay at the Hotel in the checkout time.
  • For People who are carrying your bags in the check in and the check out from the hotel they will get alone tipping from you in the time of check out 1 $ per person. Those tipping are not including in the tipping which you left at the reception of the hotel

Hotel in Hurghada:

The Tips is about 3 $ Per Person per Night. For Example, if you are 2 Person and having a 4 Nights’ accommodation in the Hotel your Tip Amount will be:

3 $ x 4 Nights x 2 Person = 24 $.

  • So you Leave 24 $ in an Envelope at the Reception on the End of your stay at the Hotel in the checkout time.
  • For People who are carrying your bags in the check in and the check out from the hotel they will get alone tipping from you in the time of check out 1 $ per person. Those tipping are not including in the tipping which you left at the reception of the hotel

For The Restaurants, Drivers, Representatives and Tour Guides:

The following amounts are Recommended and on a Per Person Basis (in American Dollars USD).

Restaurant: 1 $ per meal for Lunches and Dinners as the breakfast’s it’s included the hotel tipping

Cairo Representative 3 $ to 5 $

Aswan Representative 3 $ to 5 $

Luxor Representative 3 $ to 5 $

Drivers 20 $ (per airport transfer not per person for each transfer)

Guides 8 $ (per person per day)

Drivers 7 $ (per person per Cairo day tour) Day 02

Drivers 80 $ per Alexandria day tour not per person Day 03

Drivers 7 $ (per person per Cairo day tour) Day 04

Drivers 7 $ (per person per Aswan day tour) Day 05

Drivers 10 $ (per person per Kom Omb and Edfu Temples and transfer to Luxor) Day 08

Drivers 10 $ (per person per Luxor Day Tour) Day 09

Drivers 80 $ per transfer from Luxor to Hurghada not per person Day 10

Drivers 120 $ per transfer from Hurghada to Cairo not per person Day 14

Please Note:

Tips are not an obligation on you. It is redemption for a good service. However wages in Egypt are very low. So most people depend on tips to survive, but this is not an excuse to give a bad service. If you feel that the person is not offering you a good service or stressing you to give him tips, DO NOT GIVE TIPS or REDUCDE THE AMOUNT. But please tell him why you did that. In most cases if you don’t give tips, people such as Driver, Cruise Staff, Felucca Captain or Carriage Car Driver will think that you gave the tips to your guide to give it to them and will start a Hard Talking with him about that and waste your time.

120 US Dollars per person should pay in cash from the clients upon arrival for tipping and that will cover all the tipping such as

Hotel in Cairo

Nile Cruise boat

Restaurants

Cairo Representative

Luxor Representative

Aswan Representative

Drivers

Horse Carriage in Edfu

Felucca Ride in Aswan

For People who are carrying your bags in hotel and Nile Cruise boat

The above tipping not includes the Tour Guide tipping and that the clients should give him by them self

Tour Guide tipping 8 $ per person Per Day

Cruise Name
Initial
First Name
Last Name
Your Email
Nationality
Phone
No. Of Persons
Adults
Child
Child Age
Infant
Number of Cabins
Single
Double
Triple
Arrival Date
Departure Date
How Many Nights? Duration (In nights)
Comments or Requests
How did you hear about us?
 
captcha